Cutting for Stone

stone

Expect to be swept along by the drama of this roller-coaster of a novel. Over five hundred pages of beauty, horror, poignancy, tragedy and charm.

Verghese takes us from India to Ethiopia and the USA, revealing intricate details of surgery, rebellion, war, passion, faith and love. It is not often that a book can lift your spirit to new heights, and this one is right up there with the likes of Shantaram and similar great novels.

An unforgettable read

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The Nature of Pathetic

The Nature of Pathetic

The average life of less than average individuals. The Nature of Pathetic explores the universe of an undisclosed big city and follows the terribly hilarious misadventures of several delightfully unlucky characters. Ultimately, the question to ask is what is our place in this universe? The answer is typically to change the world for the better or reshape the planet in our image. But even the most ambitious can seem silent in the overall, grand scheme. No matter how important a conflict may seem there is always a large population of people who do not care. And waiting on others to fix the problems is the only way to assure that nothing productive will ever happen.

The Nature of Pathetic is the debut fiction work of IDK the Emcee. His beatnik inspired style gives the work a gritty, visceral tone. Claw your way through the quick read for a good laugh, deep meaning, or just to read something really weird.

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The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

haroldfry

A middle aged man sets off to post a letter and ends up walking without money, proper shoes, map, or food, for nearly 90 days, towards a destination over 600 miles away whose exact location he doesn’t even know. His mission: to save a life.

After several of the early pages wondering where on earth this story was going, I found myself drawn towards Harold, his wife, and the terminally ill woman he has decided to visit. Curiosity got the better of me and before long I was turning pages avidly, needing to know the outcome. Would he make it in time? What damage had he done to his marriage? What was the mystery surrounding his estranged son?

And it gradually dawned on me that this story is about living an extraordinary life, about having the courage to live in the unknown, to commit, and to take action, no matter how ‘dull and ordinary’ one’s circumstances are.

Harold is joined and subsequently deserted by a motley crew of well-wishers and fame seekers. Even Dog, who had, as Harold said, ‘chosen to walk with Harold for a while, and then it had chosen to stop, and walk instead with the young girl. Life was like that.’

To quote Alfred Hickling in The Guardian, Rachel Joyce successfully conveys ‘profound emotions in simple, unaffected language’.

And for me, therein lies both its charm and its success.

 

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